1/23/2006

WuiT #008: Terry Hornsby


Filed Under: Chinese New Year, Traditional Market, Lukang
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Terry is an who lived in Taiwan for many years. When we thought about doing an episode to cover (only a week away), He was definitely the man to talk to, because he is married to a Taiwanese woman (Julie) and they are the proud parents of a 8 months old daughter (Lulu). Julie's family lives in southern , Terry visits her family on the 2nd day of the Chinese New Year, this is a Taiwanese custom, that makes Terry a Taiwan Ni-Shi; which means Son In-Law of Taiwan.


Check out photos we radomly shoot that day

Terry是一位台灣女婿,過年前我們請他一起去逛了一趟台北的年貨大街,算是這個節目第一次的Sound-seeing,因為現場非常嘈雜,但是這隻Sony的麥克風還蠻適合在這種環境做訪問,錄音的品質比我預期的好一些。歡迎朋友們下載收聽。

8 comments:

Anonymous said...

Love your shows... you guys have done a great job! Keep up the good work!

p.s. - I think it's better to call it the "Lunar New Year" instead of the "Chinese New Year"... since not just the Chinese celebrates it. Vietnamese, Koreans, Taiwanese, and some other cultures also celebrate the Lunar calendar new year (yes, they're all, some more than the others, influenced by the ancient Chinese culture, but I think they're all unique in their own ways). Just my two cents. =)

Anonymous said...

Second that. We grew up in Taiwan and have been calling it "Lunar New Year" all the way. When and how did it turn into "Chinese New Year" ??

Deb said...

Of course it is called Chinese New Year, at least the Americans do.
It is not necessary to avoid the word "Chinese" all the time.

simplyme said...

Americans call it Lunar New Year too, though I agree that Chinese New Year is more frequently used. However, that does not mean the Chinese New Year usage is more correct. Note that most Westerners think most Asians are Chinese (and sometimes Japanese). The majority of them don't know much about the other Asian countries/cultures that also celebrate the lunar new year. Hence it is easy for them to think that it is just Chinese New Year (esp. when the Chinese population is so much larger than the other ones combined). Yes, it is not necessary to avoid the word "Chinese" all the time (for example, we do write Chinese and have lots of Chinese influences in Taiwan), but when it is not properly used, it should be pointed out.

Anonymous said...

This is our favorite interview of your entire collection! Terry Hornsby is such a funny guy.

Katherine and Damon from Philadelphia, USA
peik76@hotmail.com

Lobstar said...

I know Terry. I love him!!!

Anonymous said...

when the whole world recognizes us as Chinese culture,in terms of natural blood and hitorical facts, There're weirdos on this island trying to get rid of their own ehtnic blood and loathe their own culture for ... unknown reasons. you guys should go in The Guinnes Book of World Records for lying through your teeth.Schizoghrenia's definitely not splitting personality,I tell ya!

Jon Riddle Marion, Indiana said...

T. Black on the ROX. *thumbs up*